Posts

This is just a quick blog that was inspired by taking my son to the park yesterday. It is more anecdotal than scientific but something that I wanted to get across.

My son is developing so fast at the moment and it is amazing to watch. He is now 16 months and the two biggest areas I see his development in are movement and speech. It got me thinking about how we correct peoples movement problems and teach them to move better.
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So I have seen various variations on Gary Gray’s view that muscles are reactors. I think this is spot on. Muscles ARE reactors.

I think what Gary meant by this was that generally we see muscles as concentric force producers. Actually during movement we tend to need to decelerate motion by eccentric contraction first. Think walking first we flex to attenuate gravity, ground reaction forces, mass and momentum before creating force to move. So we are reacting to forces acting on the body before we create concentric force.
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What a great question. Firstly I am not really sure that there is a definitive answer so let me say sorry in advance.  The word functional seems to mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people so lets look at the Cor-Kinetic interpretation.
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Now this post equally could have been hip pain, knee pain or foot pain when running. The available motion in the big toe or hallux will affect the operation of all of these body structures during integrated movement.
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Things have been really busy with Cor-kinetic recently and I have not had a lot of time to blog. This post stems from a case I have been dealing with recently and I wanted to give an idea of our thought process at Cor-kinetic and how the symptom and cause of a problem are not always one and the same.

The patient in this case has been having Achilles problems on the left side and also lateral foot pain on the same foot. Interestingly the pain reduced the quicker he ran but more about that later.
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At Cor-Kinetic one of our foundational concepts is that of the relationship between stability and mobility.

Stability is a component part of mobility. The body needs to move in a mobile AND stable manner. Stability without mobility is RIGIDITY. Rather than a sign of functionality of the system I would see it more as a sign of dysfunction. The inability of our motor system to effectively control movement will create a rigidity in the system as the body chooses stability over mobility and closes down the system's ability to move.
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